Living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods damages educational attainment in the young

A study by researchers at the  University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin  uses data from the ISR Panel Study of Income Dynamics to follow 2,093 children from age 1 through age 17, assessing the neighborhoods in which they lived every year.

Compared to growing up in affluent neighborhoods, growing up in neighborhoods with high levels of poverty and unemployment reduces the chances of high school graduation from 96 percent to 76 percent for black children,"

The impact on white children is also harmful, but not as large, reducing their chances of graduating from 95 percent to 87 percent.

The researchers defined disadvantaged neighborhoods as those characterized by high poverty, unemployment and welfare receipt, many female-headed households, and few well-educated adults.

http://ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=8588

 

The question follows... is it possible to design out poor neighbourhoods?