Urban Design 46 April 1993 pages 34-66

Urban Design The Public Realm and Urban Design: Practice and Implementation
CONTENTS
 
This issue of Urban Design Quarterly contains the papers from the conference on The Public Realm and Urban Design held at the University of Wales at Cardiff from 7-8 April 1992. The conference was organised by Sam Romaya of the Department of City and Regional Planning in conjunction with the RIBA, RTPI and the UDG.
 
INTRODUCTION 2
John Billingham and Sam Romaya, who jointly edited the proceedings, have written the introduction and an overview of the implications for Practice and Education.
 
DECLINE AND RENAISSANCE 4
Francis Tibbalds, who died in January 1992, helped with the planning of the event so a paper he gave to the Urban Futures conference in Liverpool in September 1991 on a related subject has been included. 
 
THE PUBLIC REALM - WHO CARES? 10
Michael Welbank, President of the RTPI in 1992, reviews the attitudes taken by the Government, by the political parties, professionals, planning authorities and the public. 
 
UNDERSTANDING COMPLEXITY 14
Kelvin Campbell, Chairman of the Urban Design Group in 1991/2, argues that the art of building cities has been squeezed out by adopting a hierarchy of roads and seeking to eradicate rather than manage conflict. 
 
URBAN HOUSEKEEPING 16
Alfred Wood emphasises the qualities of traditional cities in their mixed use, non-traffic dominated enjoyable spaces. Sensitive urban management is critical if cities are to be revived by making the public realm more agreeable. 
 
REVIVING THE CITY 21
Duncan McLaren presents an environmental agenda for urban design which is based on a return to higher urban densities, providing facilities closer to their users, and travel by foot, bicycle or improved forms of public transport. 
 
THE DEVELOPER AND URBAN DESIGN 28
David Lock examines the structures of the development industry, the factors developers require to be met when funding schemes, the tendency to privatise parts of the public realm and the new direction of sustainability. 
 
LOCAL PLANS AND URBAN DESIGN 32
Les Sparks describes Birmingham City Council's recent initiatives in their commitment to Urban Design. This began in 1988 and was followed by a commissioned Urban Design Study in 1990 and the establishment of the new Department of Planning and Architecture in that year.
 
PEOPLE AND CARS 38
Ewart Parkinson, Past President of the RTPI, refers to his work in Cardiff to give pleasure and convenience to its citizens and surprise and delight to strangers. 
 
URBAN DESIGN FOR SMALL TOWNS 40
Richard Parnaby practices in Abergavenny and demonstrates the way in which urban design happens at present. He proposes that Local Plans should include explicit guidance on the form of future development in relation to the existing urban fabric.
 
BIG SITES: CREATING A SETTING 44
David Walton describes the ways in which a robust long life overall framework can be established to allow individual architects freedom within defined urban design requirements. 
 
CARDIFF BAY: THE INNER HARBOUR 48
Hank Haff gives an overview of Benjamin Thompson Associates approach to creating development on a human scale with a diverse range of uses. He shows how this has been applied to providing accessibility and a dynamic place for new life and activities in Cardiff Bay. 
 
THE ARTIST AND URBAN DESIGN 52
Sally Medlyn considers the role of artists in the urban design process. As Director of the Cardiff Bay Art Trust she has been involved with the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation in the Strategy for Public Art. 
 
TRAINING OF URBAN DESIGNERS 54
Richard Silverman and Sam Romaya present different views about the way in which architects and planners can make a contribution to urban design and whether there are any implications for the educational process. 
 
CONCLUDING DISCUSSIONS 56
Richard MacCormac chaired the final discussion session and gave some concluding remarks concerning his views on urban design.
 
List of Participants ends this section.
 
BOOK REVIEWS 60
John Punter reviews books on the aesthetics of landscape and the aesthetics of built form.
 
Michael Biddulph reviews a book concerning architecture and planning today.
 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
 
The editors would like to acknowledge the financial support of Grosvenor Waterside Developments and the Cardiff City Council in publishing this special issue of Urban Design Quarterly, as well as the assistance of the Department of City & Regional Planning in producing material for the issue.